Icon Program

 

Michel Quenot, in his book, The Icon: Window on the Kingdom, wrote that an Orthodox icon is “theology in imagery,” expressing “through colors what the Gospel proclaims in words.” Icons proclaim the Incarnation—that our Lord Jesus Christ became fully human to save us and thus can be depicted. They remind us that we are “surrounded by a great cloud of witnesses” of holy men and women that have gone on before us (Hebrews 12:1).

Inside Holy Trinity, one finds many icons that are forming not only a traditional arrangement (i.e., iconostasis, Royal Doors, Christ Pantocrator, Mother of God Platytera, etc.) shared by most Orthodox churches, but also a broader missionary-themed program of saints whose lives inspire the faithful to carry on the vision of “Building Up the Church Beyond Our Parish.”

Future Iconography

Christ Pantocrator Analogion Icon

$475 • Fully Subscribed • Commissioned December 15, 2018 • Expected by Pascha

In loving memory of Charles “Chuck” Beechan, a replacement veneration icon of Christ has been commissioned. It will be placed on the stand (analogion) in front of the existing icon of Christ on the iconostasis (pictured right), complementing it. It will be completed by Dmitry Shkolnik, who painted the icons of the iconstasis. 

Christ Pantocrator is one of the most common images in Orthodox iconography. “Pantocrator” is the Greek translation of the Hebrew title El Shaddai, meaning “all powerful.” Looser translations are “Ruler of all” or “Sustainer of all.” This attribution to Jesus was important given the Christological controversies that tore the early church. The Christ Pantocrator icons were symbols of the Nicene verdict that Christ was co-equal and co-eternal with God. Earliest known Christ Pantocrator icon are dated around the Sixth or Seventh Century.

The Christ Pantocrator icons are also called Christ the Teacher. In both icons Jesus is holding a book, sometimes open. Jesus is also making a gesture. Sometimes this is a gesture of blessing and in others it is an oratorical motion. Technically, if the book is closed it is a Christ Pantocrator icon. Christ the Teacher icons have the book open, generally showing a text from either the gospels or Saint John’s Revelation. [Source

Theotokos Analogion Icon

$475 • Fully Subscribed • Commissioned December 15, 2018 • Expected by Pascha

In loving memory of Charles “Chuck” Beechan, a replacement veneration icon of Christ has been commissioned. It will be placed on the stand (analogion) in front of the existing icon of Christ on the iconostasis (pictured right), complementing it. It will be completed by Dmitry Shkolnik, who painted the icons of the iconstasis. 

Christ Pantocrator is one of the most common images in Orthodox iconography. “Pantocrator” is the Greek translation of the Hebrew title El Shaddai, meaning “all powerful.” Looser translations are “Ruler of all” or “Sustainer of all.” This attribution to Jesus was important given the Christological controversies that tore the early church. The Christ Pantocrator icons were symbols of the Nicene verdict that Christ was co-equal and co-eternal with God. Earliest known Christ Pantocrator icon are dated around the Sixth or Seventh Century.

The Christ Pantocrator icons are also called Christ the Teacher. In both icons Jesus is holding a book, sometimes open. Jesus is also making a gesture. Sometimes this is a gesture of blessing and in others it is an oratorical motion. Technically, if the book is closed it is a Christ Pantocrator icon. Christ the Teacher icons have the book open, generally showing a text from either the gospels or Saint John’s Revelation. [Source]